Sermon for the Sunday of the Prodigal Son 2017

Sermon for the Sunday of the Prodigal Son 2017

February 12, 2017

Let us come to ourselves like the prodigal; let us, like him, speak firm words of resolve to our own souls: “I will arise and go to my Father”; and the Gracious God will perfect our small intention.

He knows that we do not know the way to Him, or the manner in which to traverse it; but, hearing us say: “Ready is my heart, O God, ready is my heart”, and seeing us begin our journey towards Him, He will then rush out to us, falling on us, and kissing our neck: He will send His All-Accomplishing Holy Spirit upon us, and guide us into all truth, not only in our understanding, but in all our deeds, all our life.

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Sermon on the New Martyrs of Russia & the Sunday of the Publican and the Pharisee 2017

Sermon on the New Martyrs of Russia & the Sunday of the Publican and the Pharisee 2017

February 04, 2017

What kind of men and women become martyrs? What is it within each of our hearts that determines our destiny and eternal fate? For what kind of open or hidden virtue does the Lord grant the supreme gift of a martyr’s crown? And which of our many sins and passions do we need to fear the most, which can so corrupt and sicken our souls that we become capable even of mocking, torturing and slaughtering God’s faithful servants?

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Sermon for Theophany 2017

Sermon for Theophany 2017

January 19, 2017

Yesterday, Christ was born; today, He is baptized. Yesterday, God immersed Himself in our flesh; today, our flesh is immersed in the Most Holy Trinity. Yesterday, the Timeless Son of the Virgin-Father was begotten in time of the Virgin-Mother; today He gives birth to us as sons of God forever.

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Sermon on the Synaxis of the Theotokos (Second Day of Nativity) 2016

Sermon on the Synaxis of the Theotokos (Second Day of Nativity) 2016

January 08, 2017

Today is the Second day of Nativity and is called the “Synaxis of the Theotokos.” The synaxis of a feast is the title applied to the commemoration that falls on the day after a Great Feast (but not all Great Feasts) which honors some person who is intimately connected with that feast. “Synaxis” means “assembly,” and today we assemble to honor the Mother of God.

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Sermon for the 25th Sunday after Pentecost 2016

Sermon for the 25th Sunday after Pentecost 2016

December 11, 2016

Today’s Gospel shows us two great wonders: one—a woman is healed from an affliction which she has suffered for eighteen whole years from an evil spirit; and, two—we see a hypocritical ruler of the synagogue completely blinded by spiritual delusion, earthly-mindedness and, not just numb to this miracle, but filled with indignation…bitter hatred and disgust; for whom? For God incarnate.

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Sermon for the Entry of the Theotokos into the Temple 2016

Sermon for the Entry of the Theotokos into the Temple 2016

December 05, 2016

In the troparion-hymn, this Feast is called the “the heralding of the salvation of mankind.” Why? Because, the Virgin will give birth to Christ, the Great High Priest, Who was not a Levitical priest, but a priest after the order of Melchizedek; He did not enter to minister in the Jewish temple, nor did He enter physically into the Holy of Holies. But, offering Himself as the Only True Sacrifice for our sins upon the Cross, He has resurrected Himself in our very flesh which He has received from the Virgin-Mother.

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Sermon for the Feast of St. Gregory Palamas 2016

Sermon for the Feast of St. Gregory Palamas 2016

November 28, 2016

Fathers, brothers, sisters although our theosis is a great mystery and its magnitude towers over our understanding,  yet St. Gregory tells us simply keep the commandments and God will unite you to Himself.

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Sermon for the Synaxis of the Unmercenary Physicians 2016

Sermon for the Synaxis of the Unmercenary Physicians 2016

November 20, 2016

On this Sunday we celebrate the Synaxis of the Holy Unmercenary Healers, or, as they are also called, the “physicians without silver.” They are those saints who, out of pure love of God and neighbor, healed the sick and mended the souls of others while asking nothing in return. It was a pure self-sacrifice born out of love. Today we remember the great saints Cyrus and John, Tryphon, Artemius, and the others, as well as Cosmas and Damian, who lived and were martyred in Roman times. And of course, we also remember and honor our great patron, the martyr and healer Panteleimon.

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